Mariah Bell

 

 

 

Mariah Cheyenne[2] Bell (born April 18, 1996) is an American figure skater. She is the 2016 Skate America silver medalist, 2016 CS U.S. International Classic silver medalist, 2016 CS Ondrej Nepela Memorial bronze medalist, and a two-time U.S. national bronze medalist (2017 and 2019).

Contents

Mariah Bell
Skate America 2016 Ladies (cropped).jpg
Bell at the 2016 Skate America
Personal information
Full name Mariah Cheyenne Bell
Country represented United States United States
Born (1996-04-18) April 18, 1996 (age 23)
Tulsa, Oklahoma
Home town Westminster, Colorado
Height 1.60 m (5 ft 3 in)
Coach Rafael Arutyunyan
Former coach Kori Ade, Rohene Ward, Billy Schneider, Cindy Sullivan, Megan Faulkner
Choreographer Rohene Ward
Former choreographer Cindy Stuart
Skating club Rocky Mountain FSC
Training locations Lakewood, California
Former training locations Monument, Colorado
Began skating 2000
World standing 14 (As of 23 March 2018)[1]
Season's bests 31 (2017–18)
ISU personal best scores
Combined total 208.07
2019 World Championships
Short program 71.26
2019 World Championships
Free skate 136.81
2019 World Championships

 

 

 

Personal life

Mariah Bell was born on April 18, 1996 in Tulsa, Oklahoma.[3] She is the second child of Kendra and Andy Bell.[4] Her older sister, Morgan, has skated with Disney on Ice.[5][6]

At age 12, Bell moved with her mother and sister from Houston to Westminster, Colorado.[7] She graduated from Ralston Valley High School in 2014,[7] and was named the school's Super Senior.[4]

Career

Early years

Bell began skating at the age of four because of her sister.[5] Early in her career, she was coached by Megan Faulkner, Billy Schneider, and Candy Brown.[8][4] At age 12, she joined Cindy Sullivan in Westminster, Colorado.[7]

At the 2012 U.S. Championships, Bell finished fifth in the junior division.[9] She was assigned to the 2012 Gardena Spring Trophy and won the junior silver medal.[10]

Bell won the silver medal in the junior division of the 2013 U.S. Championships, behind Polina Edmunds.[11]

2013–14 season

During the 2013–14 season, Bell was coached by Cindy Sullivan in Westminster, Colorado.[8] Making her ISU Junior Grand Prix debut, she won a bronze medal in Mexico[12] and finished seventh in Poland.[13] At the 2014 U.S. Championships, Bell finished thirteenth.[14] Soon after her high school graduation in 2014, she moved to Monument, Colorado, so that she could train under Kori Ade.[6]

2014–15 season

Bell's senior international debut came in the 2014–15 season. She competed at two ISU Challenger Series events, the 2014 Nebelhorn Trophy where she finished fifth,[15] and the 2014 Golden Spin of Zagreb where she placed eighth.[16] She finished sixth at the 2015 U.S. Championships, having ranked twelfth in the short program and 6th in the free skate.

2015–16 season: Grand Prix debut

In 2015–16, Bell started her season on the ISU Challenger Series (CS), placing sixth at the 2015 U.S. International Classic and 13th at the 2015 Ondrej Nepela Trophy.

Making her Grand Prix debut, Bell finished 8th at 2015 Skate America, scoring personal bests in the free skate and combined total score. She placed eleventh at the 2016 U.S. Championships.

2016–17 season

Bell changed coaches in August 2016, joining Rafael Arutyunyan in Lakewood, California.[17][18] She landed on the podium at two of her 2016–17 ISU Challenger Series assignments. Ranked second in both segments, she took silver at the 2016 CS U.S. International Classic, behind Satoko Miyahara. At the 2016 CS Ondrej Nepela Memorial, she placed fifth in the short, fourth in the free, and third overall behind Maria Sotskova and Yulia Lipnitskaya. She was invited to the 2016 Skate America to replace the injured Angela Wang.[19] She won the silver medal behind Ashley Wagner after placing sixth in the short program and first in the free skate.

In January 2017, Bell received the bronze medal at the U.S. Championships, earning her a spot on the Four Continents and World teams. In February, she placed sixth at the 2017 Four Continents Championships in Gangneung, South Korea. She later placed twelfth at her first trip to the 2017 World Championships in Helsinki, Finland.

2017–18 season

Bell began her season placing fifth at the US International Figure Skating Classic behind teammates Mirai Nagasu and Karen Chen, and was assigned to the Rostelecom Cup and the NHK Trophy on the 2017–18 ISU Grand Prix of Figure Skating circuit.

After a sixth-place finish at the 2017 Rostelecom Cup, Bell placed ninth at the 2017 NHK Trophy.

Bell was named as the second alternate to the 2018 Winter Olympics team after placing fifth at the 2018 U.S. Figure Skating Championships in San Jose. On the withdrawal of Karen Chen she was named to the 2018 World Figure Skating Championships team, and placed twelfth.

2018–19 season

Bell began the season at 2018 CS Nebelhorn Trophy, where she placed fourth overall with a score of 188.97. She was invited to 2018 Skate Canada International, where she placed fourth with a score of 190.25. In November, at 2018 NHK Trophy, she placed fifth overall with a score of 198.96, the highest in her career. She won the bronze medal at the 2018 CS Golden Spin, after placing fourth in the short program and third in the free program, earning 196.60 points.

At the 2019 U.S. Championships, Bell underrotated the second part of her combination and placed third in the short program, behind Bradie Tennell and Alysa Liu.[20] She placed second in the free skate, behind Liu, winning the bronze medal overall, the second of her career. Because the 13-year-old Liu was ineligible for senior (or even junior) international competition, Bell joined silver medalist Tennell on the American team for the 2019 World Championships, as well as the 2019 Four Continents Championships.[21]

Bell placed third in the short program at Four Continents, setting a new personal best and winning a bronze small medal.[22] The free skate proved to be less successful, with a fall on a triple loop jump and a doubled Lutz, and she fell to sixth overall.[23]

At the 2019 World Figure Skating Championships, Bell finished 9th with a career-best total score of 208.07.[24]

Controversy

At the 2019 World Figure Skating Championships, Bell was accused of deliberately causing an on-ice incident in which the blade of her free leg hit South Korean skater Lim Eun-soo during a practice session causing a cut on Lim's calf.[25] Lim's agency, All That Sports, stated to Agence-France Presse that the incident had been intentional and part of a pattern of bullying by Bell.[26] Upon request from the Korean Skating Federation, the International Skating Union conducted an investigation. On March 21, the ISU stated that it found no evidence that Bell had sought to intentionally injure Lim.[27] Rafael Arutyunyan, who coaches both Bell and Lim, denied the allegations:[28] "The thing is that Mariah’s program includes an element where she lays her leg back and stretches it. This is how it happened that she touched Lim’s leg with her blade. Of course it was not deliberately! There has never been any confrontation between them at training sessions. And by the way, look at Mariah! Do you think this girl could offend anybody? I can’t even imagine who decided to write such kind of things about her."[28]

Programs

SeasonShort programFree skatingExhibition
2018–2019
[4][29][30]
  • To Love You More
    by David Foster, Edgar Bronfman, Jr.
    performed by Celine Dion
    choreo. by Adam Rippon
    [31]
  • Divenire[32]
  • Experience
    by Ludovico Einaudi
    choreo. by Shae-Lynn Bourne
 
2017–2018
[33]
  • Chicago (soundtrack)
    • Roxie
      performed by Renée Zellweger
    • All That Jazz / Overture
      by John Kander
      choreo. by Rohene Ward

  • Across the Universe[34]
    by the Beatles
  • West Side Story
    by Leonard Bernstein
    performed by the original Broadway cast
  • Rise Up
    by Andra Day
2016–2017
[3]
  • Chicago (soundtrack)
    • Roxie
      performed by Renée Zellweger
    • All That Jazz / Overture
      by John Kander
      choreo. by Rohene Ward
  • East of Eden
    by Lee Holdridge
    choreo. by Rohene Ward
  • Rise Up
    by Andra Day
2015–2016
[6][35]
  • Storm Cry
    by David Arkenstone
    choreo. by Cindy Stuart
  • Born on the Fourth of July
    by John Williams
    choreo. by Rohene Ward
 
2014–2015
[36]
  • Little Talks
    by Of Monsters and Men
    performed by Kurt Hugo Schneider
    choreo. by Cindy Stuart
  • Titanic
    by James Horner
    choreo. by Cindy Stuart
 
2013–2014
[8]
  • Besame Mucho
    by Consuelo Velazquez
  • Malagueña
    by Ernesto Lecuona
    choreo. by Cindy Stuart
  • Titanic
    by James Horner
    choreo. by Cindy Stuart
  • On Golden Pond
    by Dave Grusin
    arranged by Andrew Lapp
2012–2013
[4]
  • I'm a Doun
    by Vanessa-Mae
    choreo. by Cindy Stuart
  • West Side Story Melody
    by Joshua Bell
    choreo. by Cindy Stuart
 
2011–2012
[4]
  • Mack and Mabel
    by Jerry Herman
    choreo. by Cindy Stuart
  • Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind
    by Joe Hisaishi
    choreo. by Cindy Stuart
 
2010–2011
[4]
  • East of Eden
    by Leonard Rosenman
    choreo. by Scott Brown
  • Cats
    by Andrew Lloyd Webber
    choreo. by Scott Brown
 

Competitive highlights

GP: Grand Prix; CS: Challenger Series; JGP: Junior Grand Prix

International[37]
Event11–1212–1313–1414–1515–1616–1717–1818–19
Worlds           12th 12th 9th
Four Continents           6th 5th 6th
GP NHK Trophy             9th 5th
GP Rostelecom Cup             6th  
GP Skate America         8th 2nd    
GP Skate Canada               4th
CS Golden Spin       8th       3rd
CS Nebelhorn       5th       4th
CS Ondrej Nepela         13th 3rd    
CS Tallinn Trophy           4th    
CS U.S. Classic         6th 2nd 5th  
International: Junior
JGP Mexico     3rd          
JGP Poland     7th          
Egna Spring Trophy   2nd            
National[4]
U.S. Champ. 5th J 2nd J 13th 6th 11th 3rd 5th 3rd
Team Events[4]
World Team Trophy               1st T
6th P
Levels: N = Novice; J = Junior
TBD = Assigned; WD = Withdrew

Detailed results

Senior level

Small medals for short and free programs awarded only at ISU Championships. At team events, medals awarded for team results only. ISU personal best scores highlighted in bold.

2018–19 season
DateEventSPFSTotal
April 11–14, 2019 2019 World Team Trophy 5
70.89
6
135.17
1T/6P
206.06
March 18–24, 2019 2019 World Championships 6
71.26
9
136.81
9
208.07
February 7–10, 2019 2019 Four Continents Championships 3
70.02
6
123.92
6
193.94
January 18–27, 2019 2019 U.S. Figure Skating Championships 3
70.30
2
142.10
3
212.40
December 5–8, 2018 2018 CS Golden Spin 4
67.82
3
128.78
3
196.60
November 9–11, 2018 2018 NHK Trophy 7
62.97
4
135.99
5
198.96
October 26–28, 2018 2018 Skate Canada International 5
63.35
4
126.90
4
190.25
September 26–29, 2018 2018 CS Nebelhorn Trophy 4
70.02
6
118.95
4
188.97
2017–18 season
DateEventSPFSTotal
March 21–23, 2018 2018 World Championships 17
59.15
12
115.25
12
174.40
January 22–28, 2018 2018 Four Continents Championships 4
62.90
5
122.94
5
185.84
January 3–5, 2018 2018 U.S. Championships 6
65.18
6
127.16
5
192.34
November 10–12, 2017 2017 NHK Trophy 9
57.75
10
108.79
9
166.04
October 20–22, 2017 2017 Rostelecom Cup 7
63.85
6
124.71
6
188.56
September 13–17, 2017 2017 U.S. Classic 4
60.68
5
107.98
5
168.66
2016–17 season
DateEventSPFSTotal
March 29 – April 2, 2017 2017 World Championships 13
61.02
9
126.21
12
187.23
February 15–19, 2017 2017 Four Continents Championships 7
61.21
7
115.89
6
177.10
January 14–22, 2017 2017 U.S. Championships 6
63.33
3
134.59
3
197.92
November 20–27, 2016 2016 CS Tallinn Trophy 6
55.92
4
111.77
4
167.69
October 21–23, 2016 2016 Skate America 6
60.92
1
130.67
2
191.59
September 28 – October 2, 2016 2016 CS Ondrej Nepela Memorial 5
56.58
4
105.14
3
161.72
September 14–18, 2016 2016 CS U.S. Classic 2
60.64
2
123.58
2
184.22

References

  1. ^ "ISU World Standings for Single & Pair Skating and Ice Dance : Ladies". International Skating Union.
  2. ^ "IceNetwork: Social Scene with Mariah Bell". IceNetwork.com.
  3. ^ a b "Mariah BELL: 2016/2017". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 20, 2017.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Mariah Bell". U.S. Figure Skating.
    "Earlier versions: 2014–2018". IceNetwork.com. Archived from the original on July 1, 2018.CS1 maint: Unfit url (link)
    "Earlier version: 2013". Archived from the original on January 28, 2013.CS1 maint: Unfit url (link)
  5. ^ a b Golden, Erin (24 January 2013). "Family's life revolves around figure skating". Omaha.com. Retrieved 25 January 2015.
  6. ^ a b c Kirk, Jenny; Lease, Dave (March 22, 2015). "Our Interview with Mariah Bell". The Skating Lesson. Archived from the original on April 25, 2015.
  7. ^ a b c Meyer, John (January 24, 2017). "Ralston Valley grad Mariah Bell emerges as a contender for Olympic team in figure skating". The Denver Post.
  8. ^ a b c "Mariah BELL: 2013/2014". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on March 24, 2014.
  9. ^ "Junior Ladies 2012 U.S. Figure Skating Championships". IceNetwork. 25 January 2012.
  10. ^ "Gardena Spring Trophy Junior Ladies Result". Federazione Italiana Sport del Ghiaccio. 15 April 2012. Archived from the original on 26 June 2012. Retrieved 25 January 2015.
  11. ^ Walker, Elvin (24 January 2013). "Edmunds wins junior ladies title at 2013 US Nationals". Golden Skate.
  12. ^ "ISU JGP Mexico Cup 2013 Junior Ladies Results". International Skating Union. Retrieved 25 January 2015.
  13. ^ "ISU JGP Baltic Cup 2013 Junior Ladies Result". International Skating Union. Retrieved 25 January 2015.
  14. ^ "Championship Ladies 2014 U.S. Figure Skating Championships". IceNetwork. Retrieved 25 January 2015.
  15. ^ "Nebelhorn Trophy 2014 Ladies Result". International Skating Union. 27 September 2014.
  16. ^ "47th Golden Spin of Zagreb Ladies Result". Croatian Skating Association. 6 December 2014. Archived from the original on 31 January 2015.
  17. ^ Donaldson-Brass, Amy (September 17, 2016). "Miyahara shows humility in dismantling ladies field". IceNetwork.com.
  18. ^ Luchianov, Vladislav (November 16, 2016). "Bell's move to Arutunian pays immediate dividends". IceNetwork.com.
  19. ^ "Team USA announces Grand Prix series event withdrawals" (Press release). U.S. Figure Skating. October 12, 2016.
  20. ^ Mammoser, Scott (January 25, 2019). "Strong start for Bradie Tennell at U.S. Nationals". Golden Skate.
  21. ^ Mammoser, Scott (January 26, 2019). "Alysa Liu swoops in for Ladies' U.S. title; makes history". Golden Skate.
  22. ^ Slater, Paula (February 7, 2019). "Bradie Tennell takes slight lead in Anaheim". Golden Skate.
  23. ^ Slater, Paula (February 9, 2019). "Kihira captures gold in Anaheim in debut at Four Continents". Golden Skate.
  24. ^ With Personal-Best Skates, Bradie Tennell And Mariah Bell Earn Top-10 Finishes At Worlds
  25. ^ "'No evidence' American figure-skater Mariah Bell deliberately slashed Lim Eun-soo of South Korea". The Washington Post.
  26. ^ "US figure skater accused of deliberately 'stabbing' Korean rival". The Independent. 2019-03-21. Retrieved 2019-03-22.
  27. ^ "ISU finds 'no evidence' that American skater deliberately injured Korean rival". CBC.ca. March 21, 2019.
  28. ^ a b "'Look at her, could she ever hurt anyone?' Coach defends US skater accused of slashing rival". RT. 2019-03-21. Retrieved 2019-03-25.
    "Арутюнян: Белл не могла намеренно нанести травму Ынсу Лим". RIA Novosti. 2019-03-21. Retrieved 2019-03-25.
  29. ^ Rutherford, Lynn (August 23, 2018). "Mariah Bell Ready for New Quad, Courtney Hicks Leaps to Altitude". U.S. Figure Skating.
  30. ^ "Mariah BELL: 2017/2018". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on September 28, 2018.
  31. ^ https://olympics.nbcsports.com/2018/11/07/mariah-bell-focused-on-the-big-picture-ahead-of-nhk-trophy/
  32. ^ 2018 Nebelhorn Trophy - Men Short - Ladies Free Program - Dance Free Dance (Dailymotion). 2018 Nebelhorn Trophy - Oberstdorf, Germany by skatingvideos. September 28, 2018.
  33. ^ "Mariah BELL: 2017/2018". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 29, 2018.
  34. ^ "Mariah Bell". IceNetwork.com. Archived from the original on September 27, 2017.CS1 maint: Unfit url (link)
  35. ^ "Mariah BELL: 2015/2016". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 28, 2016.
  36. ^ "Mariah BELL: 2014/2015". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 22, 2015.
  37. ^ Mariah Bell ISU Biography

External links